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Showing posts from January, 2013

Steampunk and Stamps and Badges Galore!

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are we halfway through this round of ROW80 yet?

I feel as though I've hit the middle point, mainly because I have some scenes to type up, which rather dissipated the editing-on-screen flow I had going. By which I mean, I missed editing night on Monday. I knit instead, so if I edit on Thursday, it'll all balance out.

I love my schedule and want to stick to it; this was a case of letting my head cold (sick again? since when does this happen to me?) act as a procrastination excuse, when I'd already had the entire weekend off to do nothing but read.

There's never enough time for reading!

I just donated to save Perrot's Folly, a Tolkien landmark in Birmingham. I've driven past this building, but I'm hoping that by the time of my next visit to the UK, it'll be open to the public:


Lookit! Steampunk wallpaper! I like this one because of the tentacle, reminiscent of the 'mistress' in my story Druid's Moon:


Does anyone else get lots of promotional…

Heinlein on the Competent Man, and New Books by Jessica Bell and Malachy McCourt

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earning something new every day is so much fun!

I've learned a few new words from reading lots of Josephine Tey this past week. Love her Englishness and mystery and the gentle wittiness of her characters.

And thanks to India Drummond's recent post on learning, I've discovered that a moment is actually a real unit of time; a medieval unit equal to 90 seconds!

India also quoted Heinlein: "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly."

In keeping with my how many books from which countries have I read question, let's see what I've got from the above list:

I can: write a sonnet (with help from Stephen Fry), balance accounts, take and give order…

Burns' Night, Montreal by Night, and Jay Lake at Night

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ne of the first poems I memorised was Robert Burns' A Red, Red Rose:

O my Luve's like a red, red rose
That's newly sprung in June;
O my Luve's like the melodie
That's sweetly play'd in tune.

As fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
So deep in luve am I:
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a' the seas gang dry:

Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,
And the rocks melt wi' the sun:
I will luve thee still, my dear,
While the sands o' life shall run.

And fare thee well, my only Luve
And fare thee well, a while!
And I will come again, my Luve,
Tho' it were ten thousand mile.

I've memorised a few because I loved them so much; this one was initially memorised for school, though I do like it. I can't remember why this poem, though. Did I choose it? Did a teacher pick it for me? Later on I had to learn Blake's Tyger Tyger, as well. Which poems have you memorised and how did you select them?

This Friday is Burns' Day, the 254th anniversary…

International Stories, Linking Fun, and Hot Chocolate!

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ink love!

I missed out on so much blogging while I was sick that I've got a backlog of visits and commenting to do. I thought I'd take you with me...

First up, the Word Wenches - authors Jo Beverley, Nicola Cornick, Cara Elliott/Andrea Penrose, Anne Gracie, Susan Fraser King/Sarah Gabriel, Mary Jo Putney, Patricia Rice, and Joanna Bourne - answer the question: "Do you get angsty and anxious at any part of the writing process? And, if you do, does it make you more productive?"

I love Jo Bourne's line: "The only cure for the pain of writing is writing."

Lots of cover art reveals recently, including India Drummond and Melanie Macek! Have you seen any others? Please share!

The fifth issue of Vine Leaves Literary Journal is out!

Has anyone ever applied to Clarion West?:


I thought I was going to, but now I'm not sure any of my current stories qualify. Unfortunately.

I posted about our snowstorm the other day; now we're having a North Pole blast. Temp…

Row80, Slow Recovery, and Charlie Sheen's Bottomless Coffee Mug (I think there's a connection there)

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h, hello.

*looks around blearily*

I think I've forgotten how to blog.

Between the nearly full week of illness, coming as it did following the holidays, during which I had a lot of wonderfully scheduled-in-advance posts, and the trying to keep to my editing schedule despite the illness, I've lost the knack of blabbing on the blog.

Though I am pleased to report that the editing is progressing on Druid's Moon. Haltingly in some cases - I might have hit the dreaded middle - but soon the Beast shall be revealed to Beauty, and then there will be lots of dialogue and interaction and "what do we do now" conversations to play with. Then the finale, and then the denouement (which I don't think I've written yet!). Hoping to be ready to write the synopsis by end-February.

About the only thing I could hold up while ill (didn't even read until the third day, I was that weak) was my iPod, so I was on Twitter quite a bit. Yes, there were catphotos. Thank you for all …

Am I Still Ill?

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adies and Gentlemen, this blog is brought to you - late and without the usual plethora of links - by what Janet Reid is calling The Galloping Crud and what Maureen Johnson calls the Plague of 2013.

All this is happening on Twitter, which I access on my iPod; about the only thing I'm strong enough to hold up. Seriously. Couldn't even raise a book until last night. Been watching a lot of Big Bang Theory and Frasier reruns.

I apologise for my continued absence in comments and on your blogs, and hope I'll be back in top form soon - and that none of you that hasn't already done so (in which case I extend chicken soup) catches this terribleness. Stay hydrated!


New York City! and ROW80

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ew York City! At Christmas!

Er, sort of. I was there the week before Christmas, but it was my first time in NYC in December, and I finally got to see the Rockefeller tree:
Tree from a distance
Tree and skating rink
Other lights
Funny how in real life - as opposed to movies - the skating rink looks so small. But the tree and the lights are lovely, as is the countdown on the Saks Fifth Avenue building. Then it was on to St. Patrick's Cathedral:
Cathedral nave
Creche
Later I wandered through the lobby of another building that had an entire village along the floor space:
Village
Churchill exhibit behind the village
Churchill closeup
Cornerstone bar, which reminded me of the Arctic Monkeys song.
The next morning I visited the New York Public Library, where they had a Dickens exhibit on:
Dickens poster above the steps
Dickens' character used to advertise whisky