Wednesday, 19 October 2011

Third POV in Rule of Three and Some Book and Contest News

What would Joss wear?

Susan Bischoff's having a contest!



In ROW80 related news, I'm moving pretty steadily; looking over reviews from beta readers for Out of the Water, and drafting here and there for Verse, Venice and Viziers. It's so exciting diving into the free flow pantsing of a new story!

In sad book-related news, this year's book fair at McGill University is the last.


I ran up the hill on my lunch hour and had my final browse, discovering a few gems (including an A. A. Milne I'd never heard of) and the hardcover of the first book of Janet Evanovich's new series for only 4$. The fair has run for four decades, but there're no volunteers left to organize and run it.

And now we come to part three of my Rule of Three Blogfest story! An as-yet untitled historical romance: Part One featured Prince Cem, and Part Two featured Ayten Hanım (Miss Ayten).

For this part, which is at 596 words, I used the prompt relationships unravel or strengthen.

Devran tapped his quill on the blotter. His eyes strayed to the letter before him, but he'd placed his palm over the offending words. It was dangerous, covering the letter that way, for his fingers twitched with the urge to crumple the paper and launch the rude demands into the cold grate.

The door opened and a maid stood aside, admitting Ayten Hanım. She kept her head down as she crossed the room, and stood before the table, and all he could see was a part of her high forehead, furrowed.

She might well wonder what had dared him to summon her to his presence, in this oddly furnished chamber. What he wouldn't give for a proper, comfortable, divan, and none of these straight backed chairs and rigid tables.

He motioned for the maid to leave, and felt his lip curl when she left the door ajar behind her. Once again reminding him that these were not his halls. That they were all guests of 'Prince' Cem, in the town of Renaissance, outside the bounds of the Ottoman Empire.

He looked again at Ayten's figure, as straight as any one of the chairs, and the paper crackled under his hands.

"I have here a missive," he began, smoothing out the sheet. "From our host. He goes on at length of last night's masquerade and the feast to be held tonight. I shall be blunt in my retelling. He asks for you."

"He summons me to his chambers?"

"Ha! If only that were all. He will have you to wed."

Raise your head, Ayten, he wanted to command. Look at me, so that I may see what these words mean to you.

"But is he not –"

"Yes, of course. You would be his second wife. For a while. I doubt not that he would choose another concubine before long." The thought of fair Ayten being used in such fashion smote his heart and he lost control of his hands. The balled letter smacked against the chimney and landed in the grate.

"I have been a slave before," she said, "and will not willingly become a chattel ever again. I am free." Yet her voice wavered, and she had not lifted her eyes.

"Of course. There are, however, conditions." He rose. Taking up the poker, he pushed the letter deeper in amongst last winter's ashes. She was only a step away from him. "I did not say he asked for you. I said he will have you. The only way to prevent his taking you by force would be for you to wed someone else."

"That's absurd!” Finally she met his gaze, but her eyes were chips of blue ice. "We leave in two days' time – would he send a fleet after us? For me?"

"There is no knowing what he might do. He is a man dangerous to cross. Thwarted in his claims to the throne, dependant on the rabble of Renaissance for succour, he is used to having his way in all smaller matters."

"How dare you!"

"I did not mean that you should be considered as such. If I had my way –" He closed the space between them, but she stepped aside. He flung the poker on the marble floor and threw himself back into the desk chair.

"Yes?" she whispered. "If you had your way?"

"I am willing that we should be married. It will keep you from a servitude you do not deserve. Only a contract, with no grounds for preventing an annulment at the soonest opportunity. If you so desire."

By the way... here's what Ayten looks like:

20 comments:

Anne Gallagher said...

What a great excerpt. I love the word "smote". I'll have to remember it.

S.P. Bowers said...

Thanks for the excerpt!

CrystalCip said...

Oh "smote" is a great word! Have a good rest of the week!

genelempp said...

Great job on your goals, Deniz. I know getting into a new project will be exciting, free flow, love it :)

Love the excerpt, well done.

Have a great second half of the week!

Nadja Notariani said...

I love that she didn't look up...that her eyes, when he saw them, were 'blue-chips of ice'...that she sidesteps him...
Ambiguity...that creator and sustainer of tension. Just great!

The Golden Eagle said...

I can't wait to find out what happens in the final installment! Loved the tension in this piece.

And thanks for posting the picture. :)

Claudia Lefeve said...

Great excerpt! Keep it coming :)

Joshua said...

What a way to cliffhang! I swear this next week is going to take forever.

li said...

Making my rounds of the 3rd week entries :-) "Rabble of Renaissance", I like that.

Misha said...

Aw I must say I love Devran. He's my favorite. :-)

David Powers King said...

You painted an excellent scene. Had no confusion of where I way and could imagine being there. The picture adds a nice touch, too. :)

Deniz Bevan said...

Thank you Anne, Sara, Crystal and Gene!

Thanks Nadja! I'm looking forward to reading everyone else's.

Thanks Eagle, Claudia, Joshua and li!

Ooh, thanks Misha [g] He's the hero of the next book, so I'm really glad you like him.

Thank you David!

J.C. Martin said...

I’ve been by to read your entry. All I can say is judging will be tough! Bring on Week 4!

J.C.

BornStoryteller said...

Ayeten is purty

Looking forward to week four

Stuart
co-host
Tale Spinning

reka sang said...

This is a exciting instalment gearing us for the grand finale...and I like the strong Ayeten.

Wendy Jane said...

Congrats on your goals. And thanks for sharing your work once again. I easily get caught up in it. Keep up the good work!

treelight said...

Oh, I like it when stories take such a turn! :)))
And that's a great picture, too. What kind of dress is that?

Deniz Bevan said...

Thanks J.C. and Stuart!
And thank you reka, Wendy and treelight! Good question about the dress. I'm assuming late-19th century Greek (which is technically 400 years after Ayten's time), as I got the image off the Orientalist Gallery.

Michael Di Gesu said...

I really like the strength in both these characters. Plus you can really feel his frustration and her fire.

Deniz Bevan said...

Oh good - I always wonder if I'm getting male POV right.

Books I'm Reading and Finished Books

  • The Owl Service by Alan Garner
  • So Anyway... by John Cleese
  • ***Reading At Intervals***
  • Nightmares and Dreamscapes by Stephen King
  • Beowulf and Sellic Spell by J. R. R. Tolkien
  • Parade's End by Ford Madox Ford
  • The War of the Ring - Book 8 in the History of Middle Earth series by Christopher Tolkien and J R R Tolkien (reread)
  • What to Expect in Baby's First Year
  • Baby's First Year for Dummies
  • 11 Doctors 11 Stories by various authors (including Neil Gaiman)
  • Creed or Chaos? by Dorothy Sayers
  • The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien manuscripts edited by J. D. Rateliff
  • Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  • The Jerusalem Bible
  • ***Finished Books***
  • Two Caravans by Monica Lewycka
  • Aunt Sass by P. L. Travers
  • An Imperial Affliction by Peter Van Houten (actually a few pages of the story, written by John Green for the film of his novel The Fault In Our Stars)
  • January Brings the Snow by Sara Coleridge (poem)
  • Kissing song by Neil Gaiman (poem)
  • The Mother by Nettie Palmer (poem)
  • William Tell Told Again by P. G. Wodehouse
  • Her Ladyship's Companion by Joanna Bourne
  • The Long Way Home by Louise Penny
  • How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny
  • Mes P'tits Contes, legends of Swiss cantons
  • see the 2014 list and statistics at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ch/2014/12/books-read-in-2014-review.html
  • see the 2013 list and statistics at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2014/01/toast-to-professor-books-read-in-2013.html
  • see the 2012 list and statistics here http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/12/the-hobbit-review-and-year-end-books.html
  • see the 2011 statistics on http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/01/books-read-in-2011-statistics-fourth.html
  • see the 2011 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/01/books-read-in-2011.html
  • see the 2010 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2010/12/books-read-in-2010-listed-here.html
  • see the 2009 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2009/12/books-read-in-2009-part-ii.html
  • also in 2009 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2009/12/books-read-in-2009-part-iv.html
  • see the 2008 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-ii.html
  • also in 2008 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-vi.html
  • also in 2008 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-iv.html