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Showing posts from June, 2017

Mini Book Reviews -- Two New Books by Kait Nolan!

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ew releases abound!

Kait Nolan has a new book in the Wishful series, See You Again:


A mother of the groom billionaire romance for the Wishful wedding of the year

Mayor Sandra Crawford has survived divorce. She's survived cancer. But she's not at all sure she'll survive the discovery that her town's billionaire philanthropist benefactor is actually the man she nearly left her husband for almost thirty years ago.

Gerald Peyton, III didn't fight for Sandy back in college--a decision he's regretted ever since. Now Trey's older, wiser, and determined to win the heart of the woman he's never forgotten.

When they wake up married in Vegas, Sandy chalks it up to a reckless mistake, but Trey's not willing to let her go so easily. Can he convince her to give their marriage a legitimate chance, or will she let him go for good this time?
Wishful is a lovely little town that makes you want to move in and make friends with everyone there! I think I like it also…

Chamonix and Mont Blanc, and Knitting Spies in Wartime

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ross-posting to the knitting blog today because I've realised that five posts from now I will have 200 posts!

Trying to get my anniversaries to run concurrently -- on 6 September, I should reach 1,100 posts on this blog and, come August, I will have been blogging for 10 years!

Came across an interesting article the other day, about knitting used by spies in WWI and WWII:


"During World War I, A grandmother in Belgium knitted at her window, watching the passing trains. As one train chugged by, she made a bumpy stitch in the fabric with her two needles. Another passed, and she dropped a stitch from the fabric, making an intentional hole. Later, she would risk her life by handing the fabric to a soldier—a fellow spy in the Belgian resistance, working to defeat the occupying German force. Whether women knitted codes into fabric or used stereotypes of knitting women as a cover, there’s a history between knitting and espionage. “Spies have been known to work code messages into knitt…