Wednesday, 11 January 2012

O! To Be In Wales, and Vachel Lindsay

Alfred R. Wallace, naturalist, wrote in 1858:

"This makes me hope I may soon realize enough to live upon and carry out my long cherished plans of a Country life in Old England."

I like his dream quite a lot. One of the first places I would is visit Hay-on-Wye in Wales, to spend a day in Bookbarn International. They have this new technology called a BOOK:

"The "BOOK" is a revolutionary breakthrough in technology: no wires, no electric circuits, no batteries, nothing to be connected or switched on. It's so easy to use even a child can operate it. Just lift its cover! Compact and portable, it can be used anywhere, even sitting in an armchair by the fire yet it is powerful enough to hold as much information as a CD-ROM disc.

Each BOOK is constructed of sequentially numbered sheets of paper (recyclable), each capable of holding thousands of bits of information.

These pages are locked together with a custom-fit device called a binder which keeps the sheets in their correct sequence.

Opaque Paper Technology (OPT) allows manufacturers to use both sides of the sheet, doubling the information density and cutting costs in half.

Experts are divided on the prospects for further increases in information density; for now BOOKs with more information simply use more pages. This makes them thicker and harder to carry, and has drawn some criticism from the mobile computing crowd.

Each sheet is scanned optically, registering information directly into your brain.

A flick of the finger takes you to the next sheet.

The BOOK may be taken up at any time and used by merely opening it.

The BOOK never crashes and never needs rebooting, though like other display devices it can become unusable if dropped in water.

The "browse" feature allows you to move instantly to any sheet, and move forward or backward as you wish.

Many come with an "index" feature, which pinpoints the exact location of any selected information for instant retrieval."

Later on, they tell you how you can "make personal notes next to BOOK text entries with an optional programming tool, the Portable Erasable Nib Cryptic Intercommunication Language Stylus (Pencils)."

Thanks to Jayne for the sneak peek at this bookstore! Visit her post for a glimpse at the bounties of Bookbarn.

Speaking of books, don't forget to visit Susan Kaye Quinn's Indie Book Fair. "Did you find a new Kindle, Nook, or iPad under the Christmas tree? Browse the Indie Book Fair and find a new ebook to break in that reader!"

So far, off that list, I've read and enjoyed Build A Man by Talli Roland and String Bridge by Jessica Bell. Looking forward to exploring the others!

Meanwhile, though, I've inching forward on my ROW80 goals. I'm 1/3 of the way through editing Rome, Rhymes and Risk (do you like the new title?) and I've started drawing up a list of research items for which I need to head to the library:

Rome
Cem Sultan
What items do you need in your ship's cabin?
Jade, silver, brass and other items of trade in the Aegean
Summertime storms on the Tyrrhenian Sea
Horses and mules and carts - how much weight can they carry?
Travel by donkey when kidnapped

Ayak was asking the other day how other bloggers come up with ideas for posts. One of my new favourite ways to discover stuff is by reading Malcolm's Book Bits and Notions, a daily (!) wrap up of interesting writing- and book-related links.

The other day, for instance, he linked to a Slate article on Vachel Lindsay: "The Mystery of Vachel Lindsay - How did the most visible poet in America—and a father of the Beats—become nearly forgotten?"

I read my first Vachel Lindsay poem in fifth grade, and I've never forgotten it. Here it is:

The Little Turtle
by Vachel Lindsay

A Recitation for Martha Wakefield, Three Years Old

There was a little turtle.
He lived in a box.
He swam in a puddle.
He climbed on the rocks.

He snapped at a mosquito.
He snapped at a flea.
He snapped at a minnow.
And he snapped at me.

He caught the mosquito.
He caught the flea.
He caught the minnow.
But he didn't catch me.




[caretta caretta, an endangered species; images taken from Google]

8 comments:

Anne Gallagher said...

I love the idea of the BOOK. It's recyclable so that makes it worth the effort of buying one to me. Those P.E.N.C.I.L.S. things sound really cool too. Handy for marginalia.

Oh, to live in England!

Carolyn Abiad said...

Caretta caretta! Oh, I <3 those! (And books too, of course.)

Al said...

That Book thing sounds like a brilliant idea.

A word of warning you are likely to get strung up by your thumbs in Wales if you even imply it is part of England. :-)

They will accept they are part of the UK, but saying they are English would go down about as well as telling a Canadian they are American, or a Kiwi they are an Aussie

Neurotic Workaholic said...

Those pictures of the turtles are cute. I wish I could own one but then my parents' dogs might get jealous. I like the description of the "BOOK". I think that if I owned one of those e-readers, I'd probably break it within the first couple weeks of owning it. It's much more difficult to break an actual book.

Deniz Bevan said...

Love it, Anne. You and I should sell lots of BOOKs and move to England :-)

I had to use the latin name, Carolyn, that's how they're always referred to in Turkey!

Did I imply Wales was in England? I hope not Al. I should have specified that on the way to England, I'd also like to visit Wales. And soon-to-be-independent-Scotland!

I only know one person who owns a turtle, Neurotic - the family owns a tortoise and he's already 40 years old!

Lynda R Young said...

The BOOK will never catch on... ;)

Glynis said...

Book? Sounds a good buy, I will have to look out for one!

Love the new title. Good luck with the writing, Deniz.

Deniz Bevan said...

I'm still holding out, Lynda!

Thanks, Glynis :-)

Books I'm Reading and Finished Books

  • Alexandria by Monica Byrne (short story)
  • Testament of Experience by Vera Brittain
  • Zoom sur Plainpalais by Corinne Jaquet
  • Sophie's Choice by William Styron
  • ***Reading At Intervals***
  • The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
  • Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  • The Young Lions by Irwin Shaw
  • Burning Sky by Lori Benton
  • 12 Anne and Avonlea books by L. M. Montgomery (skimming/reread (this was free on Kindle!))
  • Parade's End by Ford Madox Ford
  • Istanbul Noir (Akashic Books anthology)
  • The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien manuscripts edited by J. D. Rateliff
  • The Jerusalem Bible
  • ***Finished Books***
  • Hermit Crab by Peter Porter (poem)
  • The Hidden Land by Private Irving (poem; http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ch/2017/02/bits-n-pieces-writers-houseparty.html)
  • The Little Turtle by Vachel Lindsay (poem; reread)
  • Dear Mr Henshaw by Beverly Cleary
  • My Own Two Feet by Beverly Cleary
  • Managed by Kristen Callihan
  • beta read! (JB)
  • The Making of Outlander by Tara Bennett
  • The Children of Men by P. D. James
  • A Daughter's A Daughter by Mary Westmacott (Agatha Christie)
  • A Girl From Yamhill by Beverly Cleary
  • Sunlight by Margaret Rucker (poem; floating in a cocktail glass)
  • Save the Cat by Blake Snyder
  • Preface to The Hobbit, by Christopher Tolkien
  • Ilk Defa... by Beste Barki (essays)
  • Gaudy Night by Dorothy Sayers (essay)
  • The Moon and I by Betsy Byars
  • The Road to Little Dribbling by Bill Bryson
  • Rogue Warrior by Regan Walker
  • Beauty and the Beast by Villeneuve
  • Black (what was this? I don't remember!)
  • Dance of the Jakaranda by Peter Kimani
  • Thomas the Tank Engine by Rev. Awry (26 book collection)
  • beta read (Born to Run by RB)
  • The Little Turtle by Vachel Lindsay (poem; reread)
  • The Kraken by Alfred Lord Tennyson (poem)
  • Android's Dream by John Scalzi
  • The Mysterious Tadpole by Stephen Kellogg (reread)
  • Yashim Cooks Istanbul by Jason Goodwin
  • Miniatures by John Scalzi
  • Testament of Youth by Vera Brittain
  • Kitty-in-Boots by Beatrix Potter (illustrated by Quentin Blake)
  • All or Nothing by Rose Lerner (short story)
  • Merry Christmas, Emily (board book)
  • Extra Yarn by __ and Jan Klassen
  • Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  • The Outlandish Companion II by Diana Gabaldon
  • The Outlandish Companion I, Revised by Diana Gabaldon
  • MacHinery and the Cauliflowers by Alistair MacLean (short story)
  • The Dileas by Alistair MacLean (short story)
  • The Gold Watch by Alistair MacLean (short story)
  • betty, butter, sun by Monica Byrne (short story)
  • Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them screenplay by J.K. Rowling
  • The Very Cranky Bear (Scholastic)
  • various haiku by R. Wodaski
  • ongoing rereads of most board books listed last year!
  • see the 2016 list and statistics at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ch/2016/12/annual-books-read-statistics-2016.html
  • see the 2015 list and statistics at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ch/2015/12/annual-books-read-statistics.html
  • see the 2014 list and statistics at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ch/2014/12/books-read-in-2014-review.html
  • see the 2013 list and statistics at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2014/01/toast-to-professor-books-read-in-2013.html
  • see the 2012 list and statistics here http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/12/the-hobbit-review-and-year-end-books.html
  • see the 2011 statistics on http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/01/books-read-in-2011-statistics-fourth.html
  • see the 2011 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/01/books-read-in-2011.html
  • see the 2010 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2010/12/books-read-in-2010-listed-here.html
  • see the 2009 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2009/12/books-read-in-2009-part-ii.html
  • also in 2009 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2009/12/books-read-in-2009-part-iv.html
  • see the 2008 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-ii.html
  • also in 2008 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-vi.html
  • also in 2008 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-iv.html