Wednesday, 28 May 2014

Sue Townsend, Farley Mowat, Page 56! and a few Public Service Announcements

Remembering two authors today, who've recently passed away, Farley Mowat and Sue Townsend.

I've done "why doesn't my newspaper report on the important stuff" features before, on the passing of favourite authors: Peg Bracken, Madeleine l'Engle, Norma Fox Mazer, and so on.

This time, of course, I don't even know if the local Montreal paper reported on Sue Townsend, though I'm sure they did write about Farley Mowat since he's Canadian. I heard about both of these through Twitter.

It's been many years since I read any Farley Mowat. It's possible that I only ever read one - Owls in the Family, about his childhood. Now, of course, I feel guilty about this. I'd especially like to read his autobiographical works about World War II, though the ones about Canada's North are intriguing too. Here's a list of his first 15 works:

People of the Deer (1952; revised 1975)
The Regiment (1955)
Lost in the Barrens (1956)
The Dog Who Wouldn't Be (1957)
Coppermine Journey: An Account of a Great Adventure (1958)
Grey Seas Under: The Perilous Rescue Missions of a North Atlantic Salvage Tug(1959)
The Desperate People (1959; revised 1999)
Ordeal by Ice (1960)
Owls in the Family (1961)
The Serpent's Coil: An Incredible Story of Hurricane-Battered ships the Heroic Men Who Fought to Save Them (1961)
The Black Joke (1962)
Never Cry Wolf (1963)
West-Viking (1965)
The Curse of the Viking Grave (1966)
Canada North (1967)

Sue Townsend wrote the Adrian Mole diaries, of course. For some reason I didn't read these when I was young, but only came to them in my middle twenties -- which was probably better, in a way, as only the first diary dealt with the young teenage Adrian Mole, while the others followed him at later stages. I still haven't read the last one, and Adrian Mole is now older than I am!

One of my favourites of her books is The Queen and I (and the sequel Queen Camilla), in which Labour come into power in the 80s and the entire Royal family is ousted to live on a Council estate. It was fun to see Townsend's depictions of which family members managed to adapt, which didn't, and how they interacted with the other residents of the estate.

Another good one is Rebuilding Coventry, about a woman who commits a murder, in defense of a neighbour being strangled, and then goes on the run in London.

Townsend suffered from diabetes and kidney failure, and a few years ago spoke out on National Kidney Day about the importance of altruistic organ donation. Here's the BBC interview with Townsend about her disabilities, and a more extensive interview with Townsend that also includes other topics.

Last week I read (brief interjection here to say that I've been reading a lot and have not made much progress at all on ROW80 goals. Woe is me!) Bill Bryson's Neither Here Nor There, about his travels in Europe in the early 90s, and I'm using that book for...

Page 56!

*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56 per cent in your eReader (if you have to improvise, that's okay).
*Find any sentence (or a few (just don't spoil it)) that grabs you.
*Post it.

Here's Bryson:
"Goldfish daunt me. Their whole existence seems a kind of reproach. 'What's it all about?' they seem to be saying. 'I swim here, I swim there. What for?'"
To my mind, the only possible pet is a cow. Cows love you. They are harmless, they look nice, they don't need a box to crap in, they keep the grass down and they are so trusting and stupid that you cannot help but lose your heart to them."

Hmm, I don't think he noticed, when he was in Switzerland, the annual cow battles: the Combat des Reins (Fight of the Queens). I'm not making this up! The last round was a couple of weeks ago and not only was it all over the papers, it was televised too.



I took the page 56 meme from LuAnn's Back Porchervations blog. Feel free to share!

Public service announcements!

I haven't had a chance to do this yet, but a few weeks ago, on her birthday, since it was close to the anniversary of her own successful Kickstarter campaign, Amanda Palmer asked anyone who felt inclined to go support another Kickstarter project as a birthday present to her.

There are lots of intriguing projects out there, including one that's about to begin in a few days -- photographs of real librarians by Kyle Cassidy.

Neil Gaiman recently visited a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Here's a direct link to his piece in The Guardian.

And the latest Humble Bundle books bundle features a huge collection of Doctor Who comics! Pay what you like! Proceeds go to Doctors Without Borders and the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund.

The WRiTE CLUB submission deadline is fast approaching!

DL Hammons explains:
"For the newbies out there, let me explain what WRiTE CLUB is? It's a modest writing competition whose inspiration was derived from the movie FIGHT CLUB. There are numerous versions of this concept around the internet, but nothing like we do it here. This unique approach, combined with your participation, continues to set it apart from the other writing competitions and is responsible for its phenomenal growth. Its essence embodies simple, good-natured competition, with lots and lots of fun sprinkled on top.

Over the course of eight weeks I'll be holding twice-weekly bouts in which the winners will advance to the play-offs, which will ultimately lead to a single champion. Bouts between who... or what... you ask. Anonymous 500 word writing samples, submitted under a pen name by anyone who wishes to take part, that's who. The writing can be any genre, any style (even poetry) with the word count being the only restriction. It's a way to get your writing in front of a lot of readers, without having to suffer the agony of exposure.

And the winners are determined by WRiTE CLUB readers!"

Care to share a page 56 sentence?
Have you participated in WRiTE CLUB?
Any other intriguing Kickstarter (or other) projects you'd like to call attention to?

20 comments:

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Deniz .. We did hear about Sue Townsend ... she had a tough life, but came out on top through her writing .. but what a difficult end she had .. I felt for her and her family ...

I haven't read any of her books - still! and am not sure I know of Farley Mowat ..

I hadn't realised Neil Gaiman had been to Syria ... but I'm late catching up sometimes ..

I'm pleased everyone's getting excited about DL's Write Club .. and good luck to one and all ..

Cheers and good luck for all your reading ... Hilary

denisedyoung.com said...

Thanks for the book recommendations. I haven't read anything by these two authors, but I'll have to look into it.

I also just learned a couple hours ago that we lost Maya Angelou, a great American poet and writer. I saw her speak in person a couple years ago, and she was amazing--such a passionate and inspiring person. It's always sad to lose someone whose life and works inspired us.

M Pax said...

I hear a lot of news on Twitter these days. It was sad to hear of Maya this morning.

Neil is an interesting guy. I'll go read his article. thanks.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Sorry to hear of their passing. I'm not familiar with Townsend, but I have read Never Cry Wolf.
I've not participated in Write Club, but I was a judge last year!

S.P. Bowers said...

I submitted to WriteClub, did you?

Theresa Milstein said...

How sad to lose two authors.

I think that's great what Amanda Palmer requested. I don't think I've ever contributed to one.

Good of you to promote the Write Club.

Jemi Fraser said...

Farley Mowat is one of my all-time favourite authors!! I love so many of his books. 2 of my top faves would be Never Cry Wolf (I think it's one of those must reads) and Virunga - a weave of his words and the diary of Dian Fossey. Incredible stuff!

Shan Jeniah Burton said...

I loved Farley Mowatt when I was a little girl.

I read Owls in the Family when I was 8 or so. It was one of the books in my Wide Horizons reader.

As a teen, I read another of his books, this one about his dog...I'm blanking on the name.

I didn't know that he died. He introduced me to Canada, and I learned a lot about owls from him, too!

Cherie Reich said...

Aww, I hadn't heard about Sue Townsend dying, and I can't say I knew anything about Farley Mowat.

Love the Page 56 thing! I've always wanted a cow as a pet. :)

Arlee Bird said...

I'm woefully uninformed about modern writers I guess. I've never heard of these who passed. Sue Townsend vaguely, but I don't know her work. Guess I should be reading more.

Lee
What is the best short story ever written?
Tossing It Out

Jack said...

I like the page 56 you shared. It made me want to read the book. It made me want to read even more then that one book. I think I would like the Townsend's works.

debi o'neille said...

It's always sad to hear of a great writer's passing, and to hear about two, along with Maya Angelou's recent passing, it's heartbreaking. Sad is almost too small of a word.
Deb@ http://debioneille.blogspot.com

Meradeth Houston said...

Hmm, I haven't read either of those authors, but I'll have to check them out. And I love that quote from pg 56 :) Though I'd have to say the perfect pet is a goat, for much the same reasons, and other than the occasional buck, they're much easier to handle!

Medeia Sharif said...

I read many of Sue Townsend's books and adored her writing, but I'm not familiar with Mowat.

Stephanie Faris said...

It's interesting--I don't remember so many deaths when I wrote romantic fiction...children's authors tend to die. Maybe it's because people start writing children's books when we're older...or we write them well into old age?

Kelly Steel said...

Hi Deniz,

Interesting post. So many lifes impacted by novelists.

Trisha F said...

I hadn't heard about Sue Townsend until this post! Geez... how sad. :(

WRiTE CLUB should be fun to witness. hehe

Misha Gericke said...

I always find it sad when writers pass away, even if I haven't read their books. :-(

vbtremper said...

Always such interesting info on your blog! I love Bill Bryson. I haven't heard this one and I should, considering how much I love Europe, too. Good luck with your writing!

-Vicki

Deniz Bevan said...

Thanks all! I heard about Maya Angelou about an hour after I hit post on this blogpost. So sad.

Excited for Write Club to start! I was one of the preliminary judges this year, which was lots of fun.

Books I'm Reading and Finished Books

  • The Banks of Certain Rivers by Jon Harrison
  • The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien (annual reread)
  • Beowulf and Sellic Spell by J. R. R. Tolkien
  • Lessons for a Sunday Father by Claire Calman
  • ***Reading At Intervals***
  • Parade's End by Ford Madox Ford
  • The War of the Ring - Book 8 in the History of Middle Earth series by Christopher Tolkien and J R R Tolkien (reread)
  • What to Expect in Baby's First Year
  • Baby's First Year for Dummies
  • 11 Doctors 11 Stories by various authors (including Neil Gaiman)
  • Nightmares and Dreamscapes by Stephen King
  • Creed or Chaos? by Dorothy Sayers
  • The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien manuscripts edited by J. D. Rateliff
  • Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  • The Jerusalem Bible
  • ***Finished Books***
  • The Magician by Somerset Maugham
  • Rogue Spy by Joanna Bourne
  • The Hotel New Hampshire by John Irving (skimmed last third)
  • A Matter of Grave Concern by Brenda Novak
  • Fatal Fallout by Lara Lacombe
  • secret beta read!
  • The Heart of Christmas by Brenda Novak
  • Deadly Contact by Lara Lacombe
  • Carry On, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse
  • The Floating Admiral by the Detection Club, including Christie, Sayers, Chesterton, etc.
  • Brief Lives, Sandman 8 by Neil Gaiman
  • Liza of Lambeth by Somerset Maugham
  • The Mapmaker's Daughter by Laurel Corona (I give up on finishing this; skimmed to the end)
  • Childe Harold by Lord Byron (listened to the parts of it set in Switzerland read aloud)
  • Written in My Own Heart's Blood by Diana Gabaldon
  • My Dancing Bear by Helene de Klerk
  • The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith
  • The Silver Sword by Ian Serraillier
  • Jane of Lantern Hill by L. M. Montgomery
  • Tu Vas Naitre by Sylvia Kitzinger
  • Goodbye To All That by Robert Graves
  • secret beta read 2!
  • Trust Your Eyes by Linwood Barclay
  • The Caliph's Vacation by Goscinny (Iznogoud series; Canadian translation) (reread)
  • Neither Here Nor There by Bill Bryson
  • Le Tresor de Rackham le Rouge by Herge (Tintin series) (reread)
  • Le Secret de la Licorne by Herge (Tintin series) (reread)
  • L'Affaire Tournesol by Herge (Tintin series) (reread)
  • The Bum by Somerset Maugham (short story)
  • The Colour of Magic, Discworld 1 by Terry Pratchett
  • Fables and Reflections Sandman 6 by Neil Gaiman
  • Doctor Fischer of Geneva or The Bomb Party by Graham Greene
  • Once Upon an Heirloom by Kait Nolan (novella)
  • The No-Kids Club by Talli Roland
  • Snip, Snip Revenge by Medeia Sharif
  • Journey to an 800 Number by E. L. Konigsburg
  • various Neil Gaiman short stories on the An Evening With Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer album (reread (well, this time in audio))
  • And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie (reread; actually this was an older edition, published under the original title of Ten Little N******)
  • Dumb Witness by Agatha Christie (reread)
  • Never Saw It Coming by Linwood Barclay
  • How To Fall In Love by Cecelia Ahern
  • biographical note on Lord Peter Wimsey in reissue of Clouds of Witness by Dorothy Sayers (on Gutenberg)
  • One Hundred Names by Cecelia Ahern
  • Notwithstanding by Louis de Bernieres
  • The Eyes of the Dragon by Stephen King
  • Temptation by Sandy Loyd
  • The Incorrigible Mr. Lumley by Aileen Fish
  • Effie's Outlaw by Karen Lopp
  • Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler
  • The Christmas Crossing by Bev Petterson (short story)
  • secret beta read!
  • An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth by Chris Hadfield
  • Forgotten by Catherine McKenzie
  • Arranged by Catherine McKenzie
  • Emil In the Soup Tureen by Astrid Lindgren
  • Whales by Jacques Cousteau (excerpt essay from his book)
  • Tutankhamen's Tomb by Howard Carter (excerpt essay from his book)
  • Ice Dogs by Terry Lynn Johnson
  • Everything's Eventual by Stephen King
  • Go the F*^$ To Sleep (board book)
  • Green Eggs and Ham by Dr Seuss (reread) (brought to you by Neil Gaiman: http://www.worldbuilders.org/our-next-stretch-goal-unlocks-at/neil-gaiman-reads-green-eggs-and-ham)
  • The Sagan Diary by John Scalzi
  • mini Twitter stories by Talli Roland (available here: http://advice.uk.match.com/dating-advice/enjoy-valentine%E2%80%99s-day-and-get-mentallydating?utm_expid=55691082-15.2L0G0ictTcSJ4BI9Srh77A.0&utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fadvice.uk.match.com%2Fdating-advice)
  • The Book of Jane by Anne Dayton and May Vanderbilt
  • Chicken Soup for the Soul: O Canada The Wonders of Winter
  • Beloved Demons by Anthony Martignetti
  • Hands-on Therapy by T L Watson
  • Let Me Make Myself Plain by Catherine Cookson
  • The Razor's Edge by Somerset Maugham
  • Mystery of the Fat Cat by Frank Bonham
  • Spin by Catherine Mckenzie
  • Virgins by Diana Gabaldon
  • The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen (reread)
  • The Friday Night Knitting Club by Kate Jacobs
  • The Ghost in the Window by Betty Ren Wright
  • The Progress of Love by Alice Munro
  • The Treason of Isengard - Book 7 in the History of Middle Earth series by Christopher Tolkien and J R R Tolkien (reread)
  • The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J. K. Rowling (reread)
  • Behind the Lines (poems) by A. A. Milne
  • the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling (reread)
  • Chicken Soup for the Expectant Mother's Soul
  • see the 2013 list and statistics at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2014/01/toast-to-professor-books-read-in-2013.html
  • see the 2012 list and statistics here http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/12/the-hobbit-review-and-year-end-books.html
  • see the 2011 statistics on http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/01/books-read-in-2011-statistics-fourth.html
  • see the 2011 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.ca/2012/01/books-read-in-2011.html
  • see the 2010 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2010/12/books-read-in-2010-listed-here.html
  • see the 2009 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2009/12/books-read-in-2009-part-ii.html
  • also in 2009 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2009/12/books-read-in-2009-part-iv.html
  • see the 2008 list at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-ii.html
  • also in 2008 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-vi.html
  • also in 2008 at http://thegirdleofmelian.blogspot.com/2008/12/books-read-in-2008-part-iv.html